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Marketers, 80 Percent of Pinterest Users Are Female. Is Your Brand There?

Pinterest, the incredibly popular online bulletin board/scrapbook/inspiration organizer now has more than 11 million unique monthly users. And according to recent numbers from Internet-monitoring firm comScore, it has more than doubled its audience over the past six months.

So, who’s using it? You guessed it. WOMEN. Eighty percent of Pinterest users are female and they are spending more time on there than Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ combined.

The rapid growth can certainly be attributed somewhat to a higher acceptance of social networks now. But keep in mind, there are thousands of new startups in the social arena. What makes Pinterest different? As noted in an article on Mashable, CEO and co-founder of Pinterest, Ben Silbermann said, “the growth has been organic: People would join, become proud of their collections and show it to their friends.” (what women want)

And according to CNN Tech, Silberman said the site will soon roll out new profile pages that have been redesigned to look “more beautiful” and to display users’ influencers more prominently.

Women are flocking to Pinterest and the infographic below reveals just how powerful it is, but more importantly, the opportunities it offers brands. 

80% Pinterest Users are Women

Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for 
Holland + Holland Advertising,Birmingham, AL. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email

Marketers, Will Women “+1” Your Product or Service?

As if “good content” was not already becoming increasingly important in separating your site on the web, Google has just launched their +1 product for experimentation. In hopes of competing with Facebook’s “like” button, Google’s +1 will allow users to recommend sites and links to their friends and family.

For now, Google says the amount of +1’s a link attains will not impact the search ranking, but according to Google rep, Jim Prosser, during an interview with Mashable, “that is something Google is “very interested” in incorporating in some form at some point.”

When coupled with Google’s recent algorithm changes to reward “good content,” increasing search rankings for the number of recommendations  places even greater pressure on companies to listen to their consumer when developing products and advertising. For now, just being recommended within someone’s circle of friends and family will be huge.

For marketing to the female consumer, it becomes even more vital to make sure you are delivering messages that she connects with, approves of and is willing to not only share, but endorse.

This begs the question.

Do you understand the female customer pertaining to her needs and buying behavior? There is no way to get her to “share” if you don’t connect with her in the first place.

As a side note, for me, “+1” does not communicate what they are trying to say. This makes it a little confusing right out of the gate. But, if it catches on, (and I am guessing it will)  +1  provides consumers one more level of control, forcing companies and marketers  to be even more accountable. For marketing to women, you cannot afford to ignore the impact this will have.


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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email

Skittles Is Fully Committed to Social Media Marketing

skittles1I have read and heard many comments and opinions over the past week about Skittles’ edgy move with its new Web site that launched last Monday, but I have been most drawn to the debates from traditional marketers. Some still assume that Skittles plans to unveil its “real” site later. They think that this is merely a teaser campaign.

But the reality is, these marketers simply don’t get it. This is not using Social Media as a precursor to unveil a traditional marketing campaign. This IS the campaign. And while time will tell exactly how effective Skittles’ site will prove to be, one thing is for certain. They not only understand the power of Social Media Networking, they know that it is the way of the future.

Skittles is using Social Media to give complete control to consumers to tell the story of their brand. This possibly gives a whole new meaning to consumer-oriented advertising. The only thing the company is saying (or implying) is, “We are so confident with our product, we want everyone to tell how they really feel and if there is a problem, we want to know about it.” Skittles is not only embracing Social Media Networking, they are optimizing it to its fullest extent.

Stan Schroeder, IT journalist and Features Editor for Mashable, noted, “We won’t see all corporations do a complete social media makeover as Skittles did anytime soon, but we will see them give more and more importance to the various social channels out there.”

The longer you choose to rest in the comfortable world of traditional marketing, the further and further behind you will fall and the more difficult it will be to catch up with your competition.

If you are still unclear to the different outlets and tools available, Skittles’ site is a great learning ground. It provides insight to Wikipedia, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Flickr. According to Mars, the Skittles.com landing page will regularly change “depending upon what is currently in market.” Check it out.

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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email