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Hey Guys, “Name Some More Stuff I Generically Relate To….”

That is one of my favorite lines in this hysterical video, narrated by Sarah Haskins. A clever montage of six dreadful ads, it’s easy to get lost in the absurdity and hilarity of it all, but you would be wise to take note. Her observations of poor marketing to women are dead on.

Special thanks to twitter.com/TWOCOMMACOPY (via)  www.kristinamills.com/blog/ for sharing this video with me!

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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email
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Hey Guys, Is Your Female Customer Breaking Up With Your Brand?

I love this video! It’s actually a couple of years old, but it very cleverly shows how disconnected male advertisers are when it comes to understanding the female consumer and where to connect with her. As a matter of fact, I think it rings more true today than ever before. Although it’s humorous format is entertaining, the message is very serious:

The female consumer is breaking up with brands, and she is trying to tell advertisers why. Listen to her.

  • We don’t talk anymore. You’re doing all the talking.
  • We’re not exactly having dialog
  • You’re saying you love me, but you’re not behaving like you love me. It’s not genuine.
  • I’ve changed and you haven’t.
  • We don’t hang out in the same places anymore.
  • You’re not listening to me.
  • If you knew me, you’d know I don’t care anything about that…

Guys, be very careful not to assume she is breaking up with your brand because of the recession. It could be because you simply are not listening to her.

Looking for a long-lasting, trusting relationship, in this rapidly changing market? Then make an effort to know who the female consumer of today is, believe that she reacts differently than men, understand her, and know how to connect with her on the Internet.

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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email

Men, Who Do You Trust With YOUR Brand?

One of the most frequented areas of the She-conomy blog is the Marketing to Women Quick Facts, so I thought we would highlight a few of them in a short and fun video. Enjoy.

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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email

Men, Do You Have Questions About Marketing To Women?

m2w_header_logo_home2Now is the time to ask. I am in Chicago and for the next 2 days will be listening to speakers or attending workshops with some of the top leaders and researchers in the world of marketing to women. They will be discussing the topics listed below. I plan to tweet during the convention, and if you have any specific questions please feel free to send them to me @sheconomy or follow hashtag #m2w for the most updated info.

  • What Women Want in the Digital Age
  • How Marketers Can Harness the Power of Digital Influencers
  • Leveraging Women as Consumer Advocates
  • Are You Hearing What She’s Not Telling You?
  • Building a Successful Online Community with Women
  • Women Get Green & Clean
  • The Next Digital Frontier-From Impressions to Relationships
  • New Research on Marketing to Women in the Recession
  • The Changing Face of the American Female Consumer
  • Cracking the Code For Effective Social Media Marketing to Women
  • Why “Return on Women” (ROW) Should Be Your #1 Recession Strategy
  • Finding Generation O: The Evolution of Oxygen
  • The Power of Cause Branding
  • Recessionista Report: Women Behaving Smartly
  • Creative and New Ways to Reach Women

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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email

Successful viral marketing, but is it literally sick?

picture-67I, like most everyone on the Internet the last couple of days, as well as traditional media, seem to feel the need to rant about PETA’s most recent media blitz. You may or may not be aware that their ad for the Super Bowl has been banned.

NBC’s explanation:

NBC Universal vice president of advertising standards Victoria Morgan wrote that the “PETA spot submitted to Advertising Standards depicts a level of sexuality exceeding our standards,” describing one actor as “screwing herself with broccoli.”

PETA’s response:

“PETA’s veggie ads are locked out while ads for fried chicken and burgers are allowed, even though these foods make Americans fat, sick, and boring in bed,” responded PETA Senior Vice President Lisa Lange. “Whether you’re a 250-pound linebacker, a fan, or a ‘football widow,’ the smartest thing you can do to make sure that you’re around for next year’s Super Bowl is to go vegetarian.”

Hey… I find NBC’s explanation offensive, much less the ad. I also believe PETA  could have crossed the line purposely to ultimately attain far more exposure than had they run it during the Super Bowl and to save the $3 million placement cost. Their site shows they were TOO prepared for the rejection. If that was their goal, they have been successful. Because even I am participating – in the name of research. But just because it has created a popular viral interest does not mean it has successfully connected with their target audience. Possibly just the opposite.

Though the animal-rights movement was founded by a man, Peter Singer, and though many of top positions within the U.S. animal-rights movement are filled by men, women make up between 75 percent and 80 percent of the movement. Of the estimated 2.5 – 3 percent of the US population who are true vegetarians, 68 percent are female and the majority are motivated for health reasons, not animal rights.

I do believe that PeTA has been successful in doing one thing. They have offended both feminists and conservative women alike. You don’t get these two on the same page very often, but PeTA seems to have done it. Again, it is never wise to alienate the majority of your target audience. But you decide. Do you think that special woman in your life would be offended? Or has this ad made you seriously consider being a vegetarian?

VIDEO: Watch the banned PETA commerical. WARNING: May be considered explicit.


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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email

Market to Women with Social Media – Become a Leader

2009_usDuring recessionary times business owners and marketers respond differently. Some become paralyzed, some stay in their comfort zone by sticking with what has proven to work in the past, but a small few view it as a time to explore and are invigorated by the possibilities of imminent change. The latter are the ones you find yourself studying during the next recession as you seek how to not only survive but come out a leader, as the recession ends.

So, who are you? If your desire is to fall in the last group, then now is the time to be innovative. Think different. Don’t fall into what you’ve known – your comfort level. Because a recession is essentially the result of dissatisfaction. People are looking for a change. They want something new. They want to hear new ideas and they want to discover it in advanced ways.

A recession coupled with the exponentially rapid changing technology will leave you way behind if you stay within your comfort level. Making knowing exactly who your target audience is, knowing them better as well as the most effective way to reach them –  more important than ever. Not convinced? Take five minutes to view the video below, and just know that within that same five minutes, 660 new people have started new Facebook accounts.


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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email

Social Marketing is Great. Mocking Your Female Market – Not So Much

routan-mls1113082Volkswagen recently produced a series of webisodes that can be found on the Major League Soccer website. Their goal is to create a loyal relationship between soccer moms and their Routan minivan as well as instigate a viral impact on the Internet. An article that highlighted this release ran in Advertising Age a couple of days ago and the reporter noted:

While it’s perhaps not surprising that VW used a soccer platform to sell minivans, a pairing as timeless as Thanksgiving and turkey in suburban America, the somewhat mocking portrayal of soccer moms might raise a few eyebrows.

They are the, uh, target audience, after all.

And the ad agency’s assistant creative director who helped produce the campaign made the following comments to substantiate the rationale behind their concept.

Mr. Farhang believes Ms. Collins’ portrayal of a soccer mom as an overeager, close-talking scatterbrain, who, in the first episode, drives off without her soccer-playing kids, will wind up being more endearing than derisive. “As people start watching, they’ll make a deeper connection,” he said. “She takes intense pride in motherhood, even if she crosses the line sometimes.”

Well…maybe by men who find those traits “endearing.” But I am pretty sure that my husband would have been a little put off if I drove off on a 2,300 mile cross country trip leaving the kids on the side of the road in the rain. And I KNOW the other soccer moms would have thought less of me. I would have been given no chance for a deeper connection. I would have been tagged, “unfit”.

Time will tell how successful the campaign will be, but below are excerpts from some of the Comments the day the article was released (the first one is mine)

  • My guess is that these were ads developed primarily by men for women. Men who “know” they need to reach women because the numbers say they do and men who “think” they understand women. I have heard nothing but negativity or indifference about VW’s “How Women are Having Babies to get German Engineering” spots but it appears VW has decided to take the “offend your target audience” direction to the next level. VW may very well sell some minivans, but I believe the number they will NOT sell now, will be even higher.
  • I believe the whole mocking approach that Volkswagen is taking lately (first the “having babies for German engineering” spots, now the web series mocking soccer Moms, will more likely backfire than work.
  • As a 42 year-old female with 4 kids (boys) I think both the Brooke Shields (who looks great) ads and these new Soccer Mom ads are terrible. They do not resonate with me at all. In fact, I think that any of these negative campaigns by VW will simply make the viewer TUNE OUT.
  • I’m not sure that having a signature style is a virtue for any agency — especially if it alienates the very audience they are trying to reach.
  • These spots are the equivalent of a PK sailing 10 feet over the crossbar. The attitude may work selling cars to 20- somethings, but I don’t think they’re exactly the minivan buying crowd.
  • I think CP&B (agency who conceived the webisodes) is starting to lose it.
  • To say that this campaign in any way is going to go viral like Subservient Chicken for Burger King is setting yourself up for major failure in not managing expectations. To say that and not have the material to back it up is just silly and bordering on irresponsible. And unfortunately, in this case, this is not the material to back it up.
  • The minivan as a ‘mom-mobile’ is being shunned by moms precisely because of the “mom” status it confers on the driver.
  • Yes, probably more men made these spots than women did, but VW decided it was going to be a male brand. Not a brand just for males, but it would act like a male. This is in line with their thinking.

The last comment was positive toward the ads, but with women being responsible for 65% of new car sales, to risk offending this audience simply should not be an option. And if they are trying to go after men…I have to ask, why? I agree with one of the other comments. It is downright irresponsible.

Volkswagen may be able to afford to take such a risk, although in these trying economic times, I am not sure who is really able to afford to take such risks. They have spent millions and I just have to wonder, how much would they have saved by looking at it from a woman’s point of view?

I must I admit, I love to watch Mo Collins on MadTV as Stuart’s mother. But please trust me on this, unless you have money to burn, it is not advisable to mock your female target audience.

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Stephanie Holland is President and Executive Creative Director for Holland + Holland Advertising, Birmingham, Alabama. Working in an industry that is dominated by men, she is one of only 3% of the female creative directors in the country. Stephanie works mostly with male advertisers, helping them successfully market to women. Subscribe to She-conomy by Email